Emotional intelligence is the ability to perceive, control and evaluate emotions. Since 1990, Peter Salovey and John D. Mayer have been the leading researchers on emotional intelligence. There are four branches of emotional intelligence. Salovey and Mayer had presented the four emotional intelligence branches. Perceiving Emotions: The first step in understanding emotions is to accurately perceive them. Reasoning with Emotions: The next step involves using emotions to promote thinking and cognitive activity. Understanding Emotions: The emotions that we perceive can carry a wide variety of meanings. If someone is expressing angry emotions, the observer must interpret the cause of their anger and what it might mean. Managing Emotions: The ability to manage emotions effectively is a key part of emotional intelligence. There are different ways that you may measure emotional intelligence. “Reuven Bar-On's EQ-i” is a self-report test designed to measure competencies including awareness, stress tolerance, problem solving, and happiness. The Multifactor Emotional Intelligence Scale (MEIS) is the ability-based test in which test-takers perform tasks designed to assess their ability to perceive, identify, understand, and utilize emotions. The Seligman Attributional Style Questionnaire (SASQ) is originally designed as a screening test for the life insurance company Metropolitan Life. The SASQ measures optimism and pessimism. The Emotional Competence Inventory (ECI) has been based on an older instrument known as the Self-Assessment Questionnaire. The ECI involves having people who know the individual offer ratings of that person’s abilities on a number of different emotional competencies....