Preparing for an Interview

Researching Your Potential Employer Researching your potential employer should be a high priority in any job hunt. Besides making sure they are someone you are willing to work for, you can also investigate how they hire people. There are many ways to do this research. Your first stop will be your favorite search engine. You can type in terms like “company name job interview” or “company name hiring process”. Once you get a search you are happy with, go to the pages you find and start taking notes on things such as common questions that people report during interviews or any other things that stand out that do not conform to a normal interview process. Once you believe you have all the information you can gather, begin reading over your notes and keep them somewhere safe until after you are done with your interview(s) with the company. You will want to refer to them before your interview.   Researching Common Technical Questions and Responding to Them The next thing you should research is common interview questions for your specific job that you are applying for. While you may have been training or been in the field for a while now, knowing what is coming can always calm your nerves and prepare you for what you will say during the interview. One great website for this is glassdoor.com. They have a dedicated section for interviews for most job roles. Simply put in your potential job title, make sure you are searching in interviews, and press search. You will get a list of results from people who had interviews with the...

How to Negotiate Salary and Benefits

Negotiating your salary and benefits can be daunting, but sometimes you may need to do it to make sure you are charging what you are worth to the company. In these instances, negotiating items before signing an employment contract is one way to rectify this.   Research wage rates in the area and in the industry Before you begin negotiating for a higher salary, you need to do your homework first. Go online and look at what you can find. There are sites like Glassdoor that allow current and former employees post what kind of pay they received and what benefits they had. This site also aggregates this information so you can get an overall picture of the industry in regards to pay and benefits. Unless there is a good reason to, stay within this range so you have evidence to back yourself up on your arguments.   Determine if the employer is willing to negotiate This is as important as researching what the overall industry offers. If the potential employer is unwilling to budge on a wage rate, you have a few options. The first step should be determining if there is any wiggle room once they show an intention to hire you. Simply asking if something is negotiable is an easy way to get an answer.  If they say they are unable to negotiate, you should say that it is not an issue and if there will be an opportunity to revisit this in the future. These answers should be thought over before signing any employment paperwork.   Determine if the company offers other benefit programs If...

7 Steps to improve your presentation skills to get a job during a interview

Rehearse Use practice questions with friends and family to rehearse the interview so you have a good idea of what you are about to experience before doing the real thing. Do research online and figure out the most common questions.   Dress to impress Make sure you are dressing up nice for the interview. Go a step above what is expected for the field you are planning to enter.   Opening Begin every interview positively and formally. You are being reviewed until you leave the building so everything counts. Have some predetermined opening ready so you can adjust it at the actual interview.   Focus on the Interviewer The interviewer is there to see if you are a good fit for the job and they are watching and listening to everything you do. Focus on them during the interview while keeping an eye on their body language and actions.   Watch and Adjust As you progress through the interview, keep an eye on the interviewer and adjust what you are saying based off body language. For example, if you are overcomplicating an answer and the interviewer is no longer keeping eye contact, bring back the complexity until you regain their full attention.   Know Your Audience Research the company you are applying to, so you have a good idea of what they expect from you. You also want to do this to have questions to ask the interviewer at the end of the interview and knowing a few things about the company shows you are interested in the job.   Content and Delivery Every interview has a few basic...

Creating a LinkedIn Profile

Creating a LinkedIn Profile A LinkedIn profile is now becoming just as important as a resume. It is used to not only sell yourself to a potential employer, but it also requires updating. Along with that, it can be used to network and seek out colleagues and even help in a job search by researching company profiles. But before you can get to any of that, you need to have an account and a profile created. It is simple to do as well.   Intro Section Basic Profile Information All profiles need basic information to get you going. This is all done in the intro section. In this section, you enter your name and where you are located, just like on a resume at the top. You also have other options such as including a profile photo of yourself, a headline to let someone know what they are about to look over, any position or education info, and the industry you are in.  At the end, you can include contact information such as an email address, a summary, and any other media you would like to add such as photos or an external website that you want someone to look at. Background Section Work Experience and Volunteer Experience The next section that you want to fill out immediately would be your work/volunteer experience section. This would be all the jobs that you have had and currently work at. There are a few fields you need to fill out. First would be the role title you have at that company. Then you will put in the company name. As you...

Business Trip to Sydney, Australia

Scenario: You are in Milwaukee and need to get to Sydney Australia in April 2019 for a 3-day business conference at the Wesley Conference Centre for a total of one week in Australia and another 4 days for travel. All costs are in USD with conversion rates from AUD at 0.73 cents per 1 AUD   Airfare Getting to Sydney is going to take time and a lot of waiting. You will need to get to the west coast before making your final trip to Australia, so it will require figuring out the best deal for air travel. As you will be going through multiple airports, you need to factor in layovers and delays. The most direct route from Milwaukee is: Milwaukee -> Minneapolis-St. Paul -> Los Angelis -> Sydney. Delta Airlines can get you to Sydney and back for around $1200. Your total travel time combined is just under 50 hours. There are of course other airlines out there and more than one way to get to Sydney, but to get the best price, you need to plan ahead and be prepared to do a lot of research into all the available options and what you are willing to do to get there and back. The trip is not going to be an easy one and it will take a toll of your health short term, so you should keep this in mind when booking.   Total Cost: ~$1200   Hotel Getting a hotel can be difficult for conferences that are large. Getting the right one in the right place is equally as hard. There are plenty of...