Salary Negotiation for IT Computer Support Jobs

Regularly, the salary question is one or sometimes both of the following questions; “What are you looking to make?” “What are you making now?”.  These questions are coming with different tasks. The question(s) might come up later as part of the screening process or will pop up later after you have answered a few of the behavioral, skill, and/or background questions. In some compliments, it’s a good thing when the salary topic comes into the interview discussion. It shows that there is some interest in having you come to work with that employer. Most job experts will say you have the most control in negotiating a salary after you have been offered a job, at that point the employer is certain they want you. However, avoid trying to negotiate immediately after receiving the offer and before getting additional details on the rest of the recompense package. You should take times to consider everything that is offered. Also, do the best to avoid conveying up salary or, if asked, giving specific figures during the job interview. You should use that time to find out more about the job and to determine whether you want to work for the employer or not.   Be mindful that openly stating your salary expectations too early in the interview process can lead to glitches.  Early on, the company in question is not sold on you just yet. They are still feeling you out and doing comparison shopping between you and the other candidates. You will have better control to negotiate later, so it serves you best to avoid naming a specific number too early. You may be attracted to...

How to Negotiate Salary and Benefits for IT Computer Support Job

Negotiating a higher salary/pay rate is not an easy and comfortable task. Here are a few guidelines to help you get through the process with minimal stress and end up with a salary that is suitable for both sides you and the employer. When and/or the best time to Negotiate Salary. Most job experts will say you have the most control in negotiating a salary after you have been offered a job, at that point the employer is certain they want you. However, avoid trying to negotiate immediately after receiving the offer and before getting additional details on the rest of the recompense package. You should take times to consider everything that is offered. Also, do the best to avoid conveying up salary or, if asked, giving specific figures during the job interview. You should use that time to find out more about the job and to determine whether you want to work for the employer or not.   Go through the job description and requirements. You cannot just be expected to negotiate equally if you don't know/have all the information you need. If you have any outstanding requests about what you will be expected to do, the results you will need to produce, and any other benefits or perks the employer offers, find the responses to those questions before you start the negotiations about how much you will get paid. If the salary you are presented falls short of what you had been waiting for, then don't overlook other benefits the employer may have offered. The resulting benefits could save you money and make up for what may seem like a...

6 Mistakes That Will Keep You from Getting Hired

  You have the skills for the job, but somewhere in the process, everything falls apart. Maybe you never land an interview, or maybe you do, but you never hear from the company again. It can be frustrating when it feels like you’ve done everything right, but you still don’t get hired. Sometimes there’s nothing you did wrong, and any of a thousand things could have resulted in someone else landing the position. In many cases, though, people torpedo their own candidacy by making little mistakes. This can happen anywhere in the hiring process, and it’s easier to make mistakes than you might think. Things to Avoid on Your Resume   Overlooking grammar You probably won’t be surprised to hear that at Grammarly, they keep a close eye on spelling, grammar, and punctuation in resumes. But above all else, practical communication is what we assess when we’re looking at someone’s experiences on paper. Can I understand what you’re talking about? Did you highlight the most important information? Certain roles, like our recently filled community manager position, require an even closer examination of writing skills because of the necessity of writing in that role’s day-to-day function. Writing is an essential skill, employers look for it, in potential candidates because, at the very least, everyone writes emails as a representative of their company. Cover Letter Mistakes to Watch Out For Addressing it to the wrong recipient. That’s an immediate red flag and could lead to a candidate being rejected. Some can tell if a letter was copied and pasted. So, I would highly recommend you double-check your intended audience because most...

The Job Application and Preparing for a Skills Test

The Job Application The first step in your journey to get a job will always begin with the job application. This can be a simple piece of paper where you fill in the information requested, to an online application that spans multiple pages. No matter how you apply, you will be providing the same information on both. The first thing you will always have to do is provide your name, address, and contact information along with either a date of birth or a statement stating you are over a certain age. In an online environment, you will do this as part of your account creation. You will also be asked to upload your resume and cover letter if you are applying online, otherwise attach it with the application. Next you need to state what position you are applying for and if requested, if you can do the job full time, part time, or just temporarily. You will then need to provide your availability. Next you will be asked about previous employment that you have done. This would include the employers name (or name of company), your supervisor along with their phone number, the location where you worked, a date range of when you worked, and a reason for leaving the job. They may ask other information such as salary or what you did at that job. Next is education, starting with the most recent degree or school attended and going backwards. If you graduated from a college or higher, you should leave out high school information unless specifically asked for it. You will then be asked various information about...